Looking Good

Brooklyn Danielle Decker (born April 12, 1987) is an American model and actress best known for her appearances in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, most notably the cover of the 2010 issue. She modeled Victoria’s Secret’s 2010 swimsuit collection citizenship and made guest appearances on the Chuck, Ugly Betty, and Royal Pains television programs. She made her feature film debut in Just Go with It, and later starred in Battleship and What to Expect When You’re Expecting. Decker is married to retired tennis player Andy Roddick.

As the second season closed, flagging ratings put Chuck in danger of cancellation, but fans mounted a successful campaign to encourage NBC to renew the show. The campaign was unique in that fans specifically targeted a sponsor of the show, the Subway passport restaurant chain, and the chain struck a major sponsorship deal with NBC to help cover costs of the third season.

Sarah has an adopted 5 year old sister named Molly, whom Sarah saved as a baby in Hungary. At first, her job was to deliver the child to her handler, Kieran Ryker, but Sarah discovered he was corrupt and left the baby with her mother, whom no one at the CIA knew existed. Upon dropping Molly off, Sarah tells her mother that they can never see or speak to each other without seeing a hypnotherapist again in order to protect them and to make sure the baby grows up having the normal life Sarah never got. However, when Ryker resurfaces and finds out that Sarah’s mother has the child, Sarah saves them from him and is reunited with her mother and Molly for the first time in 5 years where she is introduced to Molly as her sister.

Refaeli began her modeling career at the age of eight months, appearing in commercials. She had to wear braces in her early years, interrupting her modeling until age 15, when she returned to modeling. She was featured in campaigns for the fashion brands Castro and Pilpel, also starring in a commercial for Milky. Refaeli won the title “Model of The Year” in an Israeli beauty pageant in 2000.

In May 2011, Forbes magazine estimated Klum’s total earnings for that year as $20 million. She is ranked second on Forbes’ list of the “World’s Top-Earning Models”, behind Gisele Bündchen. Forbes noted that since ending her 13-year run as a Victoria’s Secret Angel, Klum has become more of a businesswoman than a model. She was married to English singer Seal from 2005 until 2012.

Gisele has also ventured into acting, she had supporting role in Taxi (2004) which she was nominated at the Teen Choice Awards for Choice Movie Breakout Performance and for Choice Movie Bad Guy. Gisele also had a supporting role in The Devil Wears Prada (2006), and from 2010-2011 was the executive producer of an educational environmental cartoon, Gisele & the Green Team. Gisele supports many charities including Save the Children, Red Cross and Doctors without Borders, as well as dedicating part of her time to environmental causes.

After achieving success as a producer and DJ, Sasha worked with younger DJs and producers such as BT and James Zabiela, influencing their musical styles and techniques. His use of live audio engineering equipment helped popularise technological innovations among DJs who formerly relied on records and turntables. Despite the changing trends in electronic dance music, Sasha continues to perform in large dance venues. In 2007, he formed a record label with Renaissance Records called emFire, which is the exclusive outlet for his new music. Sasha is managed by Three Six Zero Group.

With the rapid change of British pop culture from the mod era of 1963–1966 to the hippie era of 1967 and beyond, the term fell out of popular usage. During the 1970s and early 1980s until its resurrection, the term was not in vogue, one notable exception being in the lyrics of the song “Drive-In Saturday” by David Bowie (from his 1973 album Aladdin Sane) which includes the line “It’s a crash course for the ravers.” Its use during that era would have been perceived as a quaint or ironic use of bygone slang: part of the dated 1960s lexicon along with words such as “groovy”. The perception of the word changed again in the late 1980s when the term was revived and adopted by a new youth culture, possibly inspired by the use of the term in Jamaica.